‘Finding Dory’ Review

finding dory poster13 years we waited and now, finally, the world can be reunited with its favourite animated fish. Pixar has once again proven itself trustworthy in being able to care for and service beloved characters in a worthwhile sequel that doesn’t drag down the original.

Finding Dory is set a mere year after the events of Finding Nemo, and follows the eponymous fish as she journeys to try and find her parents as a random memory sparks hope that she may somehow find out where she is from. She is accompanied on this journey by Nemo and Marlin, who uses his connections from the first film to bring back a host of familiar fins and faces. Each old favourite injects a wave of nostalgia into the film, elevating the atmosphere; indeed the film’s quality is helped, in general, by the nostalgia and quality of the original, as well as being fantastic in its own right. Keep your eyes peeled for the various Pixar Easter eggs as well – see if you can spot the picture of Darla snuck into the background of one of the scenes.

Dory’s search for her family is a premise that leaves room for boatloads of adventure, but also seems a worthy concept for the sequel in focusing on fleshing out one of the characters whose background remained completely unexplored in the original. The various obstacles they face and new characters they meet all serve to flesh out Dory’s character as well as add to the adventure. It also certainly reminds us of Pixar’s arguably unrivalled ability to consistently pull at the heart strings, drawing its audience into the emotional dimension of the film, and it is this that separates Pixar from the rest.

The film isn’t quite as good as the original, the journey not as smooth or evenly laid out meaning you feel less pay off at the end of, feeling less as though you’ve been through a long struggle. However, it is fun and, at times, pretty ingenious all the same.

Overall, Finding Dory is a welcome and deserving addition to the Finding canon (and will likely win over even the most possessive fans of the original), and will give a new generation its own piece of Nemo to claim hold of.

Oh, and don’t be surprised if the cinema is more full of teenagers and young adults than little kids.

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